ashramof1:

The key is to be in a state of permanent connectedness with your inner body - to feel it at all times. This will rapidly deepen and transform your life. The more consciousness you direct into the inner body, the higher its vibrational frequency becomes, much like a light that grows brighter as you…

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crisisgroup:

Analyst Q&A: Obama’s Agenda for Asia Visit | Daniel Schearf
President Obama is in Japan Thursday at the start of a four-country visit in East Asia reassuring U.S. allies of its commitment to security and stability in the region as part of the so-called “Asia pivot” or “re-balance.” The trip was delayed last year because of U.S. political fighting over budget issues. North Korea’s nuclear and missile threats are expected to dominate talks in Japan and South Korea as there are indications Pyongyang is preparing its fourth nuclear test. China’s increasingly assertive moves on disputed territory are also expected to be discussed as some worry Beijing may follow Russia’s lead in Crimea by using force to take back historic claims. VOA spoke with the Deputy Director for Northeast Asia at the International Crisis Group, Daniel Pinkston, on these issues via Skype.
FULL INTERVIEW (Voice of America)

crisisgroup:

Analyst Q&A: Obama’s Agenda for Asia Visit | Daniel Schearf

President Obama is in Japan Thursday at the start of a four-country visit in East Asia reassuring U.S. allies of its commitment to security and stability in the region as part of the so-called “Asia pivot” or “re-balance.” The trip was delayed last year because of U.S. political fighting over budget issues. North Korea’s nuclear and missile threats are expected to dominate talks in Japan and South Korea as there are indications Pyongyang is preparing its fourth nuclear test. China’s increasingly assertive moves on disputed territory are also expected to be discussed as some worry Beijing may follow Russia’s lead in Crimea by using force to take back historic claims. VOA spoke with the Deputy Director for Northeast Asia at the International Crisis Group, Daniel Pinkston, on these issues via Skype.

FULL INTERVIEW (Voice of America)

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association-of-free-people:

Potato time today, I’ll cover potatoes quickly so that those of you who’ve never planted them before will have the mystery taken out of it.

Following that is a quick primer on the way I make raised beds;

With potato seed I use the previous years leftovers that have spent the winter in the pantry. I cut them into segments with eyes or eye dimples on the segment. They are allowed to dry for a couple of days which seals the seed to prevent infection or rot when they get in the ground.

The way that I plant the potatoes is in raised beds in a shallow, horizontal trench in which I evenly space 3 seeds about 3-4” deep. In all it gives each seed a little over an unobstructed square foot to work with. When the eyes start to poke out vines in the next week or two I will cover them with a mulch mixture from my compost pile and will continue to do so until I’ve filled up the box. The vine will keep growing to reach the sun and as it does it will keep producing tubers along its vertical path. So when you harvest the taters you have tubers from the surface of the mulch all the way to that seed you stuck in the trench. I put out three boxes worth today which will yield about 60-70 pounds of potatoes.
The raised bed boxes I made are from scratch. There are pre-manufactured kits you can purchase but they are usually absurdly expensive and not worth the money if you have some basic tools and minimal carpentry skill. I’ve built boxes in several different ways and as I’ve done so they’ve evolved with the materials I’ve had available.
These particular boxes I made after calling a few exterior supply distributors looking for any scrap they wanted to get rid of. I found a guy who had a lot of discontinued composite 4x4” posts which he said I could have if I wanted to come get them. Yes, please.So what I did was cut the 4x4” composite into sections to use as my corner anchors which provided great stability. This also allowed me to use thinner lumber for the box walls. I use cedar planks for this purpose.
Do not use treated lumber for any box you plan on growing produce in. Arsenic and other chemicals used as preservatives leach into the soil and will be absorbed into your food. Avoid this. Cedar is naturally rot resistant, the boxes pictured are over 4 years old. Cedar can be expensive, especially if you buy it from a traditional lumber retailer. Here in the mid-south you can find mom and pop sawmill operators on Craigslist or people unloading cedar plank fencing and save 50-70% per board over what you would pay at Lowes or Home Depot.
On these boxes I’m using 4’ sections of cedar fencing. If you do purchase retail from a store like Lowes look for this in the garden department. Do not buy from the lumber department of the store. The cedar planking from their lumber yards is markedly more expensive than the fencing for whatever reason. I use hex-capped screws to anchor the boards to the 4x4 sections. This allows me to easily remove the board if it needs replacing at some point in the future. The hex-cap anchor screws are a more expensive feature but they are money well spent being that they will not strip like a Philips head and can be reused many times over.
In the future we’ll look at some of the other boxes I’ve built with whatever has been readily available at the time of construction. As I alluded to earlier, there are many ways to build boxes.
Anyone can do it and do it affordably. It takes a little creativity and a little work but it is rewarding and enjoyable and I encourage anyone who is interested in homesteading and DIY to give it a try. As always I’m happy to answer questions or chat about gardening and agriculture- feel free to drop me a line.

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Are the Photos Evidence of Russian Connection to Militants in Ukraine?: http://youtu.be/TfGw5OxoxmI via @YouTube

(via http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=13xRMm1-yoA&u=/watch?v=TfGw5OxoxmI&feature=share)